/ Thoughts

My ramblings about things I've seen and believed. Or disbelieved.




ACTFL 2017 Part 1: Plan of Attack


1000 sessions.  Three days. One.  Thousand.  Sessions. Just the idea of the size of ACTFL's Annual Convention is overwhelming to think about.  Even for someone who attends state (Wisconsin) and regional (Central States) conferences regularly, ACTFL is a bit overstimulating.  There are thousands of attendees.  It's insane.  How do you even approach something like this?  This will be my third ACTFL conference, so while I'm not necessarily a "seasoned pro", I've got some experience with this, and still remember how thoroughly overwhelmed I was by some aspects of my previous two conferences (San Diego & Boston).  If you want more tips, Carrie Toth wrote her own list on her site.  Check back here for daily updates from the convention!

1.  Attend the Opening Session

I still remember Rick Steves's speech in San Diego.  He was outstanding.  During his speech, #ACTFL15 was trending on Twitter.  It was remarkable.  The opening general session from 8:30-10am on Friday morning will feature journalist Bill Weir presenting "Stories from Cultures Around the World".  The five regional finalists for the national Foreign Language Teacher of the Year will be there and the winner will be selected.  For first timers especially, there is also a convention welcome & orientation from 7-8am.

2.  Have a Goal

Between sessions, presentations, and exhibitor workshops there are over 1000 possible learning opportunities.  And that doesn't count the pre-conference workshops and paper presentations.  Looking at a time on the schedule with 100+ things to see can be really challenging.  Is there something in particular that you would like to learn about?  Maybe you're trying to incorporate new technology.  Maybe you've got a textbook you dislike.  Need to inject more reading? Want to find more review games? Pick a mission or two. Whatever your goal is, define it clearly.  Use that to hack away at the sessions that don't meet your goal.  You can't become an expert in everything in 3 days.  If you're looking for a list of sessions that focus on Comprehensible Input-based themes, check out this list compiled by Palmyra Languages.  The Fluency Matters booth will also have a printed list available as well as the one linked on their website.

3.  Rest Your Brain

There are 14 different session times on the schedule.  That means you could soak up 14 hours of professional learning over the span of 3 days.  Here is a secret:  you don't have to attend a session every single time one is offered.  If none of the sessions at a time meet your goal (see above), or if you feel your brain getting full, it's okay to take some time off.  You may want to just process what you've learned.  Maybe you need to get some physical movement by walking a lap around the convention center.  If you're staying close enough, there is nothing wrong with a little siesta.  Maybe sitting down and blogging, or writing lesson plans inspired by a session will benefit you.  I know, you're thinking, "But Kelly, I paid SO much for this convention & the travel!  I need to get my money's worth!" I say this:  Think of how you pace learning in your class.  Quality teachers don't just "cover" material because students don't acquire it  well.  Your brain is the same.  "Covering" more topics during the convention won't necessarily allow you to acquire any of the topics and incorporate those into your teaching.  You might actually get a better VALUE for your money by processing what you've learned.

4.  Meet people, attend "other" events, or just be a tourist

There are frequently other groups that get together and hold events during the conference.  Sometimes states or regions hold receptions.  Online PLCs may have a get-together.  Maybe you've got a long-lost friend from another state who will attend with his school.  Take advantage of meeting people you don't get other opportunities to bond with.  On Saturday night at 8, there will be an event called "Hot for Teacher: World Languages Edition" where some funny and talented teachers will share stories from their classroom...and no hot topic is off topic.  Tickets are available for $10 from Third Coast Comedy Club while they last (only 100 available). Or, visit a site in Nashville!  After all, you may not get here again soon to see the Country Music Hall of Fame!

5.  Exhibit hall--be there!

There are so many exhibitors to visit!  Way beyond what you've ever seen at state or regional conferences.  Companies you have never heard of. And several you have.  Check out the things they offer.  Or just cruise by and get some swag.  (Okay, I know...but we all do it!) And if you want to say hi to me, I'll be spending some time at the Señor Wooly booth!  It's worth it to take a lap through the hall.  Besides, after sitting and learning, you'll welcome the exercise!  

 

CI? I thought you used TPRS!


Among several proficient and reputed experts of TPRS (Teaching Proficiency Through Reading & Storytelling), there has been some discussion about how one defines oneself. There is no shortage of acronyms to go around, of course, but recently there has been a significant number of teachers dropping the TPRS label and instead referring to themselves as CI teachers.  CI?  No, people are fans of this site enough to have become CI teachers in my honor.  In this case, CI stands for Comprehensible Input. Comprehensible Input isn't a technique.  It isn't a method.  It isn't even a philosophy. Stephen D. Krashen wrote about comprehensible input in his Comprehension Hypothesis long before I began teaching.  Here is a link to Krashen's writing if you want to read the source.  Since then he has refined his hypotheses to include the indispensability of compelling input.  But the point is that if we are able to understand messages, and do so repeatedly enough, language soaks into our brains.  This happens faster if we're interested in those messages.
ci umbrella draft

Image by E. Dentlinger

So claiming oneself to be a CI teacher, is a statement that a teacher acknowledges that language is acquired through comprehensible input, and that teacher develops plans in order to provide students with a maximum amount of comprehensible input.  And TPRS teachers fall under this umbrella. TPRS is a specific 3-step method.  And the goal of TPRS is to provide students with repetitive, comprehensible input.  But why are some TPRS experts dropping that label?  A couple of reasons.
  1.  It is too narrow.  Many teachers are moving to doing student interviews, reading and discussing novels, talking about social issues, movie talks, and a myriad of other activities that aren't technically the 3 steps of TPRS.  Some teachers who are well-versed in the techniques of TPRS, and who present workshops about TPRS find themselves using  TPRS techniques like "circling" to discuss and converse but never truly ask a story.  So TPRS feels like the wrong label.
  2. Peer pressure.  I can say from personal experience that it can be tough being the only TPRS teacher in a large school in a large district.  And TPRS seems like you're really bucking the system.  And when someone gets swept up in the euphoria of this new method, it can be hard not to preach about the new language acquisition theory you learn.  It can be hard to keep from turning others off with your born-again teacher excitement.  Everyone wants to buy something, but nobody wants to be sold anything.  By saying you're a CI teacher, you can point to the ACTFL position statement which few would be able to find fault with.
  3. Political Correctness.  Since TPRS began growing as a method, it has faced opposition.  Some thought it was just another fad. Some heard of the trend toward bizarre stories and figured it worked for clown-like teachers and looked on practitioners as the hippies of the teaching world.  Some even thought it was a cult. (See the enthusiasm thing above.) It is not lightly that I say many TPRS teachers have felt like they need to stay in a teaching methods closet.  It can be hard to "come out" as a TPRS teacher, especially in one's initial attempts to use this inspiring new method, before their own results can prove they made the correct decision.
So, TPRS is CI.  But not all CI is technically TPRS.  And my thoughts?  A TPRS-based class with other CI activities for variety is probably the best of all possible worlds. So what are CI activities? How does one use CI if it isn't TPRS?  You'll just have to read more about that in my next update!  

La casa de la Dentista...part 1: My Review


When Jim Wooldridge (Sr. Wooly) asked me to review his new graphic novel, I JUMPED at the chance!! You can't blame me for not resisting a sneak peek of what he calls "...the best story I've ever created in any medium. ", right?  So I was over the moon when the book landed in my mailbox.

La casa de la Dentista

But does it hold up to the hype?  Is it really that good? Yeah.  It is. A young girl has nightmares about her...la Dentista.  And at school the folklore continues as the world remembers the incident...so long ago...well, you'll just have to read about that part.  I was going to tell you more, but then I got a phone call... But this book really is good.  The art is AMAZING.  I couldn't wait to read the whole book.  I was so impatient, I decided we were going to have a little extra FVR time in class, just so I could read!

Best excuse for FVR...Profe wants to read!

The story has humor, and twists at every point.  Just when you think you have it figured out, something new happens that you didn't expect! But is it scary?!? Well, it's suspenseful.  And while to describe the plot it is more intense and psychologically mindblowing than the original video (on the surface, "A girl doesn't want to go to the dentist because the dentist is a kind of spider-like sadistic creature with no teeth." doesn't sound like much), it feels less scary to me.  The music and sound effects of the video make it a much more bothersome experience in my opinion than the graphic novel.  The action in the graphic novel, does build to a much more suspenseful climax, and doesn't give a lot of relief from that tension.  But the nice thing about a book is that you can control how quickly you get into and through that tension.  You can put the book down, or skip past a scary image by turning the page.  While I wouldn't recommend it to younger elementary classes, my estimation is that this would be fine for use in middle school and older.  And some elementary kids will also LOVE this.  As with anything, you need to know your kids, and know if this is right for them. But should we really believe you?  Didn't you just do this for the free copy? No...okay, yeah...but I love and respect you all too much to lie to you about this.  I promise, I'm already plotting how I'm going to use this with my students when it is available.  And to put more behind my review, I've asked students to review it for me also.    So stay tuned for part 2 when I share with you what my students say about this book...I'm showing it to level 1 and level 5!! To be continued...

TPRS/CI-Friendly Sessions at WAFLT 2017


I've noticed a recent trend among other TPRS/CI type folks to put together a list for big conferences like ACTFL of all the sessions that may be of special interest to those of us focusing on COMPELLING, CONTEXTUALIZED COMPREHENSIBLE INPUT. So, for those similarly-minded folks, here are a list of sessions at the upcoming annual conference of the Wisconsin Association For Language Teachers that might be of interest.  These are sessions presented by CI teachers, as well as some personally recommended sessions by presenters who have good stuff to say, regardless of their CI-ness.  Of course, there are lots of other good sessions too...so don't assume things off my list are not worth seeing!  And if you see any sessions I should add, let me know! Thursday Pre-Conference Workshop:  10a-4pm  "Moving Along the Road to Proficiency: Where Do We Need to Go? How Do We Get There?"  by Helena Curtain, Jessica Bradley, Carol Hartmann, Theresa Kruschke-Alfonso The Greendale Schools have got their stuff TOGETHER!  It's worth seeing if you're able to attend Thursday. Friday Workshops 8:30am-11:30am ($ extra cost) FW-1  "Looking Forward, Planning Backward"   by Carrie Toth FW-10 "Using Children's Books in the Target Language..." by Jean Hindson   *Disclaimer: I don't know about Professor Hindson at all. But usually reading sessions have value for CI folks. Friday Afternoon Sessions  1:45-2:45pm A-9  "Let's Breakout"  by Jennifer Peterson & Paula Meyer  *Okay, not really truly CI, but a LOT of CI teachers use Breakouts, so you may want to experience one! A-10 "Social Media? For Professional Development?  Yes, really!" by Kelly Ferguson  *Yep, it's me!! And while CI things might get even more of a mention, this session really is for anyone!! A-12 "Strategies for Building or Activating Background Knowledge" by Melody Leung  *It's an ESL session, and ESL people tend to really get language acquisition/comprehensibility stuff.  I don't actually know Melody personally. Friday Afternoon Session 3:15-4:15pm B-1 "Taking the Lead: Proficiency-Oriented Programs in Practice" by Lisa Hendrickson.  *I love Lisa.  We all love Lisa.  Go watch Lisa. B-5 "Boost Creativity & Proficiency with Augmented Reality" by Deana Zorko.  *Come see why Deana was a CSCTFL Teacher of the Year. B-10 "National Board Certification in World Languages" by Meg Graham.  *Might wanna think about it.  Also, if you're in the Madison area, we've got great mentorship going! Friday Awards Ceremony & Keynote Come hear Carrie Toth speak!  DO IT!! Saturday Morning Sessions 8:00am-9:00am C-1 "Breakout EDU! Break Into Classroom Creativity" by Andrea Behn  *Another chance to check out breakouts.  I don't know if this session lets you actually experience one though. Saturday Morning Sessions  9:30-10:30am D-13 "Warm Up With Culture in the Target Language" by Nicole Thompson & Taylor Rutter  *I don't know these teachers, but I bet there are some ideas for comprehensible authentic resources in this session! Saturday Afternoon Sessions 1:30-2:30pm E-1 "TOYs Talk Proficiency" by Josh LeGreve and several former WAFLT Teachers of the Year (TOYs). E-7 "Inclusive Pedagogy for the Language Classroom" by Joshua Brown, Connor Zielinski, Tristan Devick  *Okay, I don't often want to recommend sessions by University folks, and I don't know ANY of these presenters, but diversity, inclusion, and culturally-relevant teaching is kind of a "thing" for me, so fingers crossed this session does its topic justice! E-9 "CI Tailored for Classicists" by Daniel Tess Saturday Afternoon Sessions 1:30-3:00pm T-4 "Can you Breakout EDU?" by Kari Ewoldt  *Yep, another breakout session.  This one includes doing a breakout and debriefing, then talk about how to connect to your curriculum. Saturday Afternoon Sessions 2:45-3:45pm F-2 "Life Hacks:  Classroom Edition"  *Woo-Hoo!  Me again!  An assortment of tips and tricks to make every minute filled with language from even before students enter your room!                      

CI on the Block


90 minutes.

An hour and a half. To some people the idea of trying to engage students for this immense amount of time is frightening.  It must be impossible!  And to do a TPRS class for 90 minutes?  How does one sustain that energy?
On the other hand, there are plenty of other teachers who find themselves on the opposite end of the scale.  90 minutes would be a luxury, the Jacuzzi tub of class periods.  How wonderful it must be to have all the time you want (and more) in a day with your students, instead of rushing through a 42-minute class. No matter your comfort level with a long class period, a block schedule does create some logistical issues for the lesson plan.  In order to know how to plan a block class effectively for a TPRS/CI classroom (and I will distinguish later why I’m not just saying TPRS), we need to understand a few universal truths about a block schedule:
  1. Just because the period is twice as long, it doesn’t mean you can just teach two days in one day.
  2. You won’t see your kids daily, or you won’t see them all year.  You get 90 days, not 180.
  3. Block scheduling gives teachers fewer preps and possibly more planning time (in theory). And often (in theory) class sizes are smaller.  In theory.
  4. With fewer different classes (and fewer class periods), some “housekeeping” tasks like taking attendance and dealing with absent students happen less often.
  5. In a 4x4 block schedule, students can often “double up” on subjects that interest them, taking multiple levels in one year. This is an advantage to students who would like to reach high levels of World Language classes or take more than one language.
  6. You can NOT expect to talk for 90 minutes every day.  It is bad for your voice and students will not love you for that.
There are as many different block schedules, and odds are some administrator will pick a really confusing one. There is a year-long alternate-day block, a 4x4 block (4 classes/day, for a semester), a trimester plan where students take 2-3 courses three times/year, or any other wacky combination an administrator can dream up with rotating daily schedule.  Some schools even attempt a hybrid schedule with some “regular” classes and some “block” classes.  In the 2016-17 school year, my schedule is Spanish 4 every day 1st block, for the fall semester, and in the spring semester, another different section of Spanish 4.  My 2nd block class will be AP Spanish Literature & Culture on A days, and Spanish 1 on B days, both of those lasting all year.  I only teach 2 classes per day because I'm department chair, so I've got extra administrative time rather than an 3rd block. So how DO we plan for a block class as TPRS teachers?  My first answer is that you cannot sustain PURE TPRS for the entire period, unless you are a superhuman individual.  Blaine Ray can probably do this.  Katya Paukova can probably do this.  On a rare day, I could maybe do this.  Most people will never be able to make a TPRS story last a full 90 minutes and hold student attention.  Yes, I mean all 3 steps.  Establish meaning, ask the story, read.  This is really hard to do ALL of these things about the same structures and same plots for 90 minutes.  Does this mean we shouldn’t try? No…the more you can go slowly and make the circling of target structures last, the better those will be acquired by your students.  But it will not happen every day.  It likely won’t happen regularly or even often.  You might never have a story that lasts that long.  I don’t think I have.  And that is fine. What I find more helpful is to have a variety of activities that provide students with comprehensible input, even if they are not truly TPRS activities.  This is why I make the distinction between TPRS and CI.  LET ME BE CLEAR:  CI or TCI is NOT a method.  TPRS is a method.  Teaching with Comprehensible Input is more of a philosophy that says we believe students acquire language when they receive comprehensible input.  Most TPRS teachers will add in “repetitive” and “compelling” to that description.  But CI-based teaching does not necessarily rely upon the repetitive (circling) and compelling (personalized) input that TPRS relies upon in instruction. When planning my lessons, I consider all of the CI activities I can think of and try to rotate those through my week to give students the variety their brains crave.  Here is a (not complete) list, in no particular order) of CI-based activities that I often draw from.
  • Ask a TPRS story
  • Watch/talk about a Sr. Wooly video
  • Movie Talk
  • Read a novel
  • Listen to some sort of listening activity (textbook activity that I’ve probably changed the directions of, podcast, news in slow Spanish, University of Texas/Austin listening proficiency exercises)
  • Read & then study a song
  • Read yesterday’s TPRS story
  • TPR activity
  • Game (Kahoot, Quizlet Live, Mafia, Verba, Apples to Apples, whatever!) Okay, some of my games aren’t really that CI-based.  But they are fun, in Spanish, and give my kids a break during our long class. So sue me.
  • Free Voluntary Reading
  • PQA/Conversation
  • The circumlocution game—okay, another confession. This is TOTALLY output.  But my kids like it and does give them practice of a vital skill.  I play this with my upper level kids only.  They can use any gestures and/or Spanish words they want to in an effort to convey the meaning of a word or phrase they probably don’t know how to say, to their team.
  • Class yoga (think Simon Says, but more stretching-based, and nobody gets “out”)
  • Mindfulness practice—a guided relaxation activity or breathing exercise to focus students or energize them.
So what might a week in my class look like?  The key is to divide and conquer.  You cannot simply do 2 TPRS stories, each 45-minutes long.  That is too overwhelming to students and draining for you.  My advice is to think of your class period as 2 or 3 different segments and to draw out a longer activity over multiple days.  This allows things to “marinade” in the students’ brains and will allow them to process the material they learn, even subconsciously, to allow for deeper acquisition.  So here is a chart of what my first two weeks of my Spanish 1 class might look like.  My class times might be different than yours, but this is one way you can go about structuring your life.  (Note: My class is on an A/B day schedule, so really, to get 10 days for me it's 4 weeks...but this is easier to visualize, so while it won't match exactly what my life is like, it's completely representative of my teaching.)
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
PQA/Conversation Warm Up (4 questions about yesterday’s PQA) Warm Up (3-4 questions about TPRS story) Warm Up (3-4 questions about yesterday’s PQA) Warm Up
TPR Break Finish TPRS story (has, goes, wants) PQA/ Conversation PQA/ Conversation Finish TPRS story from yesterday
TPRS Story (has, goes, wants) Mindfulness break TPR Break Mindfulness break TPR Break
PQA/ Conversation Read TPRS parallel story TPRS Story (different story than before with has, goes, wants but also add in says) PQA/ Conversation
Kahoot game with TPRS/PQA vocabulary
 
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Warm Up (questions about PQA kids they haven’t answered about yet) Warm Up (questions about TPRS Story 2) Warm Up (Questions about PQA or Sr. Wooly) Warm Up (Questions about new story or Sr. Wooly) Warm Up (questions about PQA)
PQA/ Conversation Pop Quiz on TPRS vocabulary (comprehension) PQA/ Conversation Sr. Wooly pop-up video Review story & read it.
TPR Break Mindfulness break TPR Break TPRS Story  (finish) TPR Break
Señor Wooly song: (read lyrics to establish meaning, watch video w/ both subtitles) PQA/ Conversation TPRS Story (has, goes, wants, says, gives, sees)  TPR Break Quiz on TPRS vocabulary.
TPR Break Sr. Wooly song (review tough lyrics, do an activity or 2 from the packet, watch video w/ no subtitles PQA / Conversation Sr. Wooly video game competition
TPRS Story—read story from last Thursday and Friday Señor Wooly song (review lyrics, do some exercises from supplement pack, listen & watch video w/ Spanish subtitles & movie talk the video) PQA / Conversation
Okay, I know what you’re all thinking, especially if you’re new to TPRS—no homework?  I might give homework during these 2 weeks.  I might not.  Depends on the kids.  Maybe reading a story will happen at home.  Maybe they’ll do a Sr. Wooly worksheet or one of the “nuggets” on the site.  Maybe they will draw pictures to illustrate one of our TPRS Stories and we’ll do a quick picture-talk or retell of the story from those.  I don’t know usually much beforehand what my students will be ready for as far as homework until I meet them.  The rest of this plan is pretty realistically what I will do this year (and I’ll actually update it as this year goes along…so you’ll see what I really do.  But as I write this now in the middle of August, this is the best I can do.  Check back in mid-September and you’ll see more accurately what I did and what I assigned. So, what about upper levels?  What do I do in Spanish 4?  There is no shortage of resources and curricula for a level 1 or 2 class.  But how on earth do you structure level 4? Basically, the same.  As a matter of fact, you'll see very similar activities between my 2 very different levels.  The idea of "work smarter not harder" is my mantra.  When I do a Sr. Wooly song in level 1, I do the same song in level 4.  When I movietalk in level 1, I will show the same movie in level 4.  What changes?  The complexity of language I use to discuss these things.  For example, in Sr. Wooly's "Puedo ir al baño", I might ask my level 1 kids "¿Quiere Justin ir al baño?" (Does Justin want to go to the bathroom?) and ask my level 4 kids "¿Quiere Justin que Carlos vaya al baño?" (Does Justin want Carlos to go to the bathroom?). So, here is week 1 Level 4 (again, check back after I've been in school and I'll show exactly what I really did)
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
PQA/Conversation Warm Up (4 questions about yesterday’s PQA) Warm Up (3-4 questions about TPRS story) Warm Up (3-4 questions about yesterday’s PQA) Warm Up (questions about yesterday's article)
TPR Break Finish TPRS story (had, went, wanted) PQA/ Conversation PQA/ Conversation Start a song study, "Dale la vuelta a la tortilla"
TPRS Story (had, wanted, went, including subjunctive) Mindfulness break TPR Break Mindfulness break TPR Break
PQA/ Conversation Read TPRS parallel story Read an article and discuss PQA/ Conversation
Plans for the weekend
 
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Warm Up:  Questions about weekend   Warm Up (4 questions about yesterday’s PQA) Warm Up (3-4 questions about readings & song we've done) Warm Up (3-4 questions about yesterday’s PQA) Warm Up (questions about TRPS Story)
PQA/Conversation Review song PQA/ Conversation PQA/ Conversation Finish TPRS story from yesterday (reading)
  TPR Break Mindfulness break TPR Break Mindfulness break TPR Break
 Review song from last week PQA/ Conversation TPRS Story TPRS Story (continued from yesterday) PQA/ Conversation
Introduction to Guatemala (leading into reading Esperanza)
 

CI? I thought you used TPRS!


Among several proficient and reputed experts of TPRS (Teaching Proficiency Through Reading & Storytelling), there has been some discussion about how one defines oneself. There is no shortage of acronyms to go around, of course, but recently there has been a significant number of teachers dropping the TPRS label and instead referring to themselves as CI teachers.  CI?  No, people are fans of this site enough to have become CI teachers in my honor.  In this case, CI stands for Comprehensible Input. Comprehensible Input isn't a technique.  It isn't a method.  It isn't even a philosophy. Stephen D. Krashen wrote about comprehensible input in his Comprehension Hypothesis long before I began teaching.  Here is a link to Krashen's writing if you want to read the source.  Since then he has refined his hypotheses to include the indispensability of compelling input.  But the point is that if we are able to understand messages, and do so repeatedly enough, language soaks into our brains.  This happens faster if we're interested in those messages.
ci umbrella draft

Image by E. Dentlinger

So claiming oneself to be a CI teacher, is a statement that a teacher acknowledges that language is acquired through comprehensible input, and that teacher develops plans in order to provide students with a maximum amount of comprehensible input.  And TPRS teachers fall under this umbrella. TPRS is a specific 3-step method.  And the goal of TPRS is to provide students with repetitive, comprehensible input.  But why are some TPRS experts dropping that label?  A couple of reasons.
  1.  It is too narrow.  Many teachers are moving to doing student interviews, reading and discussing novels, talking about social issues, movie talks, and a myriad of other activities that aren't technically the 3 steps of TPRS.  Some teachers who are well-versed in the techniques of TPRS, and who present workshops about TPRS find themselves using  TPRS techniques like "circling" to discuss and converse but never truly ask a story.  So TPRS feels like the wrong label.
  2. Peer pressure.  I can say from personal experience that it can be tough being the only TPRS teacher in a large school in a large district.  And TPRS seems like you're really bucking the system.  And when someone gets swept up in the euphoria of this new method, it can be hard not to preach about the new language acquisition theory you learn.  It can be hard to keep from turning others off with your born-again teacher excitement.  Everyone wants to buy something, but nobody wants to be sold anything.  By saying you're a CI teacher, you can point to the ACTFL position statement which few would be able to find fault with.
  3. Political Correctness.  Since TPRS began growing as a method, it has faced opposition.  Some thought it was just another fad. Some heard of the trend toward bizarre stories and figured it worked for clown-like teachers and looked on practitioners as the hippies of the teaching world.  Some even thought it was a cult. (See the enthusiasm thing above.) It is not lightly that I say many TPRS teachers have felt like they need to stay in a teaching methods closet.  It can be hard to "come out" as a TPRS teacher, especially in one's initial attempts to use this inspiring new method, before their own results can prove they made the correct decision.
So, TPRS is CI.  But not all CI is technically TPRS.  And my thoughts?  A TPRS-based class with other CI activities for variety is probably the best of all possible worlds. So what are CI activities? How does one use CI if it isn't TPRS?  You'll just have to read more about that in my next update!